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Highlights of 2017, Prospects for 2018

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

The “highlights” of 2017 are mostly lowlights.  The year began with the inauguration of a racist US president who pledged to build a border wall to keep out Mexican “killers and rapists”, ban Muslims from entering America and tear up the liberal international order in favour of an America First strategy of nationalism, protectionism and xenophobia. While many of Trump’s actions have been symbolic, his clampdown on refugees and immigrants is very real.  2017 was …

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Brexit: Sufficient progress, Irish fudge, much still to do

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

“Sufficient progress” has been made on the terms of the UK’s orderly withdrawal from the EU to move on to discussing the framework of their future relationship next year. That is the European Commission’s recommendation to EU leaders who meet at the European Council on 14-15 December. Barring unforeseen hitches, that means negotiations can soon move on to discussing the post-Brexit transition period that the UK has requested and the …

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Brexiteers’ delusion of regulatory independence

In Blog by Sam Lowe0 Comments

By Sam Lowe Far from reclaiming its independence, post-Brexit Britain will have to choose between remaining within the EU’s regulatory ambit or performing a transatlantic pivot towards the US. Either way, it will be a rule-taker, not a rule-maker Brexit-induced dreams of independence have poisoned Britain’s political discourse. Scarcely a day goes by without a new rallying cry plastered across a tabloid front page: We will break free of the …

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More open?

In Blog by Rebekah Smith0 Comments

By Rebekah Smith Global migration is only likely to increase. But while there are strong international institutions to address global issues such as trade and development, international cooperation on migration issues remains threadbare. Worse, it has a gaping hole: it fails to do anything to facilitate increased people flows. That urgently needs to change. Europe’s “refugee crisis” – a misnomer, as Patrick Kingsley explains in The New Odyssey – highlights …

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There’s nothing more patriotic than wanting your country to be better

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

By Jack Graham Reactionary nationalists like to portray themselves as the only true patriots, but wanting the best for your country ought to mean embracing openness and progress Nasty nationalism is back in force in Western politics. Since the Brexit vote, government ministers have attacked Remainers – those who wish Britain to remain in the European Union (EU) – and sceptical journalists for being unpatriotic. In the US, Donald Trump …

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Can Brexit Britain really become a global trader?

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

By Guy de Jonquières There is no need to leave the EU to trade more with the rest of the world; Germany exports five times more to China than Britain does. Indeed, far from creating an open, free-trading Global Britain, Brexit is likely to close the UK off more Brexit enthusiasts love to talk up the wealth of economic opportunities they claim Britain will have once it leaves the EU. …

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Leaked UK immigration proposals could wreck hopes of a Brexit deal

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

It’s been a bad week for those of us who believe in open societies. Donald Trump cancelled an Obama-era programme that shields from deportation undocumented immigrants who arrived in the US as children. And leaked UK immigration proposals set out harsh terms for EU citizens after Brexit that threaten to scupper the already deadlocked Brexit negotiations. It is morally wrong to threaten to deport young people who basically know only the US, have done nothing wrong and should not be held responsible …

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Renegotiating NAFTA: “fair” or foul?

In Blog by Marta Bengoa0 Comments

By Marta Bengoa Amid all the controversies surrounding President Donald Trump, the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the US, Canada and Mexico – which starts tomorrow – may seem relatively unimportant. But think again. The US’s NAFTA partners spend some $600 billion a year on American goods and services, making them its biggest export market. As the US’s neighbours, the future of their trade relations …

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Free trade requires openness to people too

In Blog by Hosuk Lee-Makiyama0 Comments

By Philippe Legrain   Britain’s international trade minister, Liam Fox, was in Washington DC this week crowing about prospects for a post-Brexit trade deal with the US. Cue much clucking about whether this would entail the UK having to accept “chlorinated chicken”. Fox insisted that there wasn’t even a nugget of truth to fears that American poultry was unsafe to eat. But feathers flew when another leading Brexiteer, environment minister …

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The case for freedom of movement

In Blog by Philippe Legrain0 Comments

The single most important determinant of people’s life chances is not how talented they are or how hard they work, it’s where they were born. A bright, enterprising, hard-working woman born in an African village is likely to lead a worse life than a lazy dimwit born in North America, Europe or Australia. Migration can change that. In fact, allowing people in poorer countries to move to richer ones with …

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